Rack of Lamb

Rack of lamb with potato rosti and arugula pesto


Rack of Lamb

  • 1 (8-rib) rack of lamb. Deboned and thick fat cap removed
  • ¾ tsp Kosher salt
  • ½ tsp fresh cracked black pepper
  • ½ cup of olive oil
  • ½ tsp of dried native mint

1

Combine the olive oil, cracked black pepper and native mint together and mix well.

2

Cut the deboned (loin) lamb in half across the centre to create two equal pieces.

3

Pour the oil mix over the lamb and marinate for about 12 hours.

4

Preheat oven to 190°C degrees.

5

Heat a large heavy skillet, with a metal handle, over high heat until hot, for at least 2 minutes. Pat lamb dry with a paper towel. Season meat all over with kosher salt.

6

Add oil to hot skillet, place loin fat side down and sear until a nice dark caramel brown for about 3-4 minutes. Turn loin over and sear meat side until slight crust has formed.

7

Remove pan from heat (leaving lamb in the same position as above). Place skillet in oven on middle shelf and roast for about 10 minutes. To check temperature, insert thermometer diagonally into centre of meat (internal temperature will rise to 51 to 54°C for medium-rare while lamb stands).

8

If cooked to desired temperature, remove from the oven and place on a wire rack to rest. Let rest for 3-4 minutes before cutting to serve. Once rested, plate lamb with other components.


Potato Rosti

  • 500g potatoes
  • 1-½ tsp salt
  • Generous ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tbs vegetable or olive oil for frying; more as needed

1

Peel the potatoes and grate them, using the large holes of a hand grater or a food processor.

2

Put the potatoes in a large bowl, add the salt and pepper, and toss to coat thoroughly. Let the potatoes rest for at least 5 minutes.

3

Working with a fistful at a time, squeeze as much liquid as possible out of the potatoes and transfer to a second bowl (the potatoes will start to discolor, but that won’t really affect the final results). You need to get rid of as much liquid as possible, so just squeeze small handfuls at a time.

4

Heat a heavy-based skillet over medium-high heat. Add the oil (it should come to a depth of about 3mm; add more if-necessary).

5

When the oil begins to ripple and quiver slightly, test it by dropping in a potato shred—it should sizzle enthusiastically. If not, wait a few more seconds.

6

When the temperature is right, take a fistful of potatoes, wring it out once more, and keeping it in a ball, place into the centre of the pan. (Be careful because the oil will splatter; getting hit by a few tiny droplets is inevitable.) Gently push down the ball to create a flat patty about 1.27 cm thick.

7

Repeat the process, cooking 4 patties at a time.

8

Adjust the heat so that you hear a lively sizzle but the bottom isn’t browning too rapidly. Cook until the underside is a deep golden brown and the potatoes on the top are starting to look translucent, 12 to 16 minutes. (Taste a few strands—they should be almost fully cooked and tender).

9

Once brown, carefully flip each rosti, cooking until the new bottom is browned and the potatoes feel really tender in the middle when poked with a knife, another 6 to 8 minutes.

10

Slide the rösti onto a cutting board if you’re serving it immediately, or to a cooling rack to hold it for a few minutes. Blot the top with a paper towel to remove any excess oil.


Arugula Pesto

  • 4 cups packed fresh arugula
  • 1 tbs minced garlic
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 cup pure olive oil
  • 2 tbs walnuts toasted
  • ½ cup freshly grated Parmesan

1

Prepare an ice water bath in a large bowl and bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.

2

Put the arugula in a large sieve and plunge it into the boiling water. Immediately immerse all the arugula and stir so that it blanches evenly. Blanch for about 15 seconds.

3

Remove, shake off the excess water, then plunge the arugula into the ice water bath and stir again so it cools as fast as possible. Drain well.

4

Squeeze the water out of the arugula with your hands until very dry.

5

Roughly chop the arugula and put in a blender. Add garlic, salt and pepper to taste, olive oil and walnuts. Blend for at least 30 seconds. In this way the green of the arugula will thoroughly colour the oil.

6

Add the cheese and pulse to combine.

7

The pesto will keep for several days in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator.


About The Chef - Jason Gould

Native Australian chef Jason Gould’s first foray into cooking and the culinary scene commenced in 1985 at the tender age of twelve while working as a dishwasher at a local pub in Melbourne, Australia. At age fifteen, he stepped into the hectic world of fast food restaurants where he immediately came to appreciate and love the strict training, the camaraderie, and the tempo required to deliver a variety of delicious foods to many patrons.

While receiving his formal training at Dandenong College, Jason continued to work at several different restaurants and hotels before leaving Australia and travelling to London where he landed a job at the renowned “The Mirabelle”, a Marco Pierre White Restaurant. Starting out as a vegetable cook, Jason quickly progressed and moved up to the position of Sous Chef. But it was through his travels throughout Europe, in particular a stint in Austria at the Vital Dorant Royal Hotel, that provided Jason with insights into the different styles and regions of German and Austrian cuisine and where Jason honed his skills; perfecting a style uniquely his own.

Gould left Europe and headed to New York City. However, due to the precipitous timing of September 11th in 2001, Gould headed to Houston to visit a relative where a fortuitous meeting with Chef Scott Tycer led to a position at the acclaimed Aries Restaurant - Gould was in Houston to stay. After working with Scott for three years, Gould grabbed the culinary bull by the horns and decided to venture into business with Scott - the result is Houston’s Gravitas Restaurant. Gravitas is a favored eatery of many a Houstonian and boasts American Bistro Style cuisine featuring succulent dishes encompassing many unique ingredients.

Chef Jason Gould’s culinary expertise has been rewarded numerous times, receiving the following awards:

  • 2006 My Table magazine’s 11th
  • Annual Awards for Culinary Excellence “Up-And-Coming Chef of the Year”
  • 2007 My Table magazine’s 12th
  • Annual Awards for Culinary Excellence “Chef of the Year”
(These accolades mark the first time a chef has consecutively won “Up-And-Coming Chef” and “Chef of the Year” in the award’s 11 year history).


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